Frequently Asked Questions


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See the Why Fairtrade? page on this website. Also visit the Fairtrade Foundation website at www.fairtrade.org.uk.

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The most common are coffee, tea, bananas, sugar, chocolate, biscuits and clothing. All the supermarkets now sell the first three whilst the Fairtrade shop in Shirley, Southampton sells a wider range of Fairtrade products.

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  1. The local council must pass a resolution supporting Fairtrade, and serve Fairtrade coffee and tea at its meetings and in offices and canteens.

  2. A range of Fairtrade products must be readily available in 24 of the area's shops and served in 12 catering outlets.

  3. Fairtrade products must be used by a number of local work places and community organisations.

  4. There must be popular support for the campaign.

  5. A local Fairtrade steering group must be convened to ensure continued commitment to Fairtrade Town status.

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No, but there is a council representative on the Committee.

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Environmental protection and sustainability must be included in producer organisations' management policies.

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Fairtrade status is achieved by meeting the criteria set by the Fairtrade Foundation. Once these have been met then the Borough can regard itself as a Fairtrade Borough. In brief it requires that there are a minimum number of retailers, catering establishments and organisations that stock or serve Fairtrade goods in the area. The exact numbers required of each are proportionate to the size and population of the Borough.

A:

Sometimes, but not always - and having the knowledge that a fair price is then going direct to the supplier or grower who can then feed his family and develop his business must be worth a few pence extra - that's our view anyway. Even if just one product in your weekly shop is Fairtrade that would still make a difference.

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Supermarkets tend to make 3-5% profit on average on their goods. So the more a product costs the more pence profit they make - but the percentage is more or less consistent with non-fair trade goods.

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Fairtrade is not charity, it is trade, and the beauty of many of the Fairtrade goods is that they are not in competition with British producers. Coffee, tea, bananas, cocoa etc.. do not grow on the British Isles - let's import them for a fair price, not the cheapest possible.

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The Fairtrade movement has many parallels with those who campaigned against the slavery trade 200 years ago. There are adults and children being paid so little for producing some of the goods on our shelves that they can only just exist - that is extreme poverty - and the future of many developing countries relies on trade to lift them out of poverty. If we do not pay a fair price for the goods we buy from them, then they will remain in abject poverty for years to come. You might like to look at the slavery exhibition page at http://the-park.net/moggerhangerpark/.

A:

No. It is about treating people fairly. It is about paying the original supplier/grower a fair price for the goods so as to make it a functional business and he/she has enough to live on. It is about meaning that adults and children are not paid a wage which is akin to slavery. Saying that, this concept does align with the teachings of the major faiths so you will find many folk involved do have a faith.

A:

Yes. The Fairtrade shop do sell in bulk or see our Wholesalers page for details.